Category Archives: Humor

Men’s Fashion: All Eyes On…

Timothee Chalamet. He is part of the menswear vanguard challenging the notion that dressing up means black suiting. He uses color, textiles, and embellishments typically reserved for women — but why should they have all the fun?

Timmy has been consistently delivering impeccable looks for a couple of years now. With a big new movie about to come out, keep an eye on his fashion choices over the winter season.

Below are six favorite recent outfits, each of which has a dominant element that can be taken as inspiration.  While some of the tailoring will be difficult for civilians to pull off, let it inspire you to rethink gender restrictions and body proportions.

  1. Electric Blue.  Regardless of skin tone, there is a shade of rich blue that can work.
Haider Ackermann

2. Embroidery.  High contrast works best when used sparingly.

Haider Ackermann

3. Color Blocking.  Keep the neutral more prominent.

Haider Ackermann

4. Florals.  A black base grounds things and keeps it edgy.

Haider Ackermann

5. Evening Wear Beading.  Okay, we realize this may be double-black-diamond, expert level clotheswearing.  Something to aspire to.

Louis Vuitton

6. Gender Non-Conforming. *Warning: below is a trained professional on an enclosed track. Do not attempt at home.*  His success pulling off multiple femme elements is what makes this his best look ever. You have got the satin, the cinched waist, the curls, cropped pants, and a camisole top all in sync.

Consider trying just one of those elements if you are feeling daring.

Haider Ackermann

Weekly Reading

Articles that Lady in Red found fascinating this week:

  1. When it’s okay to adopt the dialect of your audience: “It Wasn’t ‘Verbal Blackface.’ AOC Was Code-Switching.” https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/04/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-code-switches-black-english/586723/
  2. David Frum elegantly documents Canada’s sweetheart stepping in it: “Justin Trudeau Falls From Grace” https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/04/snc-lavalin-justin-trudeaus-fall-grace/586645/
  3. “Nobody wanted to hear me read ‘Ozymandias.’” Why are we all loving the Varsity Blues scandal?: “They Had It Coming” https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/04/what-college-admissions-scandal-reveals/586468/
  4. The best travel writing you may ever read: “Where Heaven and Earth Come Closer” https://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/11/travel/thin-places-where-we-are-jolted-out-of-old-ways-of-seeing-the-world.html
  5. “‘I am synthetic life form ‘Yoko K.,’ assembled in the US with components made in Japan…designed to assume the role of an ‘electronic musician.’ I am one of many secret agents sent to this time to plant magical thinking in people through the use of ‘pre-22nd century nostalgia Mars pop music.’” How to make hospital beeps more pleasant and more meaningful: “Anatomy of a beep: A medical device giant and an avant-garde musician set out to redesign a heart monitor’s chirps” https://www.statnews.com/2018/09/10/medtronic-musician-redesign-heart-monitors-beeps/

The Road to Hell is Also Loud

The trend of architectural minimalism as luxury means that many public establishments exceed a healthy decibel limit. Think restaurants, coffee shops, art galleries, and stores. After decades of investing in high-maintenance soft surfaces, proprietor preferences have now put efficiency and disposability over acoustic integrity, and favor metal furniture, exposed ceilings, and open spaces.

To fool us, the claim they are recapturing mid-century modern styles: the last era when American exceptionalism went mostly unquestioned. Yet despite the advertisement, high ceilings and no cloth are actually NOT midcentury style:

According to this article,

“Trends that today’s diners associate with luxury, such as hard surfaces and open kitchens, were, in mid-century, mainly relegated to lowbrow spaces such as cafes, cafeterias, and diners. The finest eateries…were the most highly ornamented and plush. Even high-modernist interiors made extensive use of soft goods, including cloth tablecloths, heavy drapes, carpeted floors, and upholstered seating. Across the board, mid-century restaurants had low ceilings, often with acoustic ceiling tiles.”

Not only are loud restaurants cheaper to build and maintain, but they also encourage diners to spend more.

So, what is trendy is also noisy. So what? So, this admiration of din contributes to the erosion of civil society.  Noise pollution desensitizes us to coarseness in the other senses as well. There may or may not be any studies to back this claim up, but I believe that the more obnoxious the public space, the more likely violence is to follow. This is why people in bars and nightclubs feel free to get drunk, break bottles, punch faces, and grind on the dance floor: the loud DJ!

What’s next? Streakers at Chipotle?  

If you are or plan to be a business owner, I implore you to invest in noise reduction strategies. Or at the very least, use music that will subdue the masses.

Many thanks,

LIR

Papyrus Font Creator Defends Himself After SNL

This weekend’s SNL episode ft. Ryan Gosling received its highest praise for the video sketch that examines the Avatar movies’ title font.

“Costello sold the font for $750 and told CBSN he receives ‘very low’ royalty payments now that it has been a computer standard since 2000.”

Read more here: http://www.vulture.com/2017/10/papyrus-creator-mounts-his-defense-against-snl-avatar-joke.html





Meditations on Crisis Management

bbw_obama_cool_102714

Bloomberg has a fabulous article out about Obama’s travails at “Crisis Management.”  As an executive known for her execution skills, Lady In Red would like to give Pres. Obama some much-too-late advice on dealing with the unexpected:

1. People rarely make decisions NOT based on emotion.  Obama often fails to acknowledge and work around this.  People need narratives to survive.

2. Time and study are luxuries you cannot afford in a crisis, no matter how rich you are or how much help you have.  That’s why you went to school before beginning your career.  Now you are a professional, and your mind should be a minuteman sleeping with his boots on.  You should have a solid idea of your values already, and how you will prioritize and act when those values inevitably collide.   Summits and workgroups during a public health pandemic of fear?  Ain’t nobody got time for that.

4. Fake it til you make it–it being attitude.  Leaders set the tone.  Act how you want other people to act, even if you personally don’t feel up to it.  You are doing yourself a favor down the line.  Everything you do and say publicly can and should serve a purpose and be moving people toward your goal, and that endgame will feel better than any minor annoyance you feel now.

What recommendations do you have for Obama as we enter the home stretch of his presidency?