Tag Archives: election

WaPo: “Americans have seen the last four presidents as illegitimate.”

“We talk about all this with detached regret, as victims of distant politicians’ antics, when we are in fact protagonists in this tale, helping to determine the tenor of our politics. The Internet and social media have engaged millions of Americans in politics more directly than ever before, and the results haven’t been pretty.”

Read the whole thing here:*
https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2017/01/20/americans-have-seen-the-last-four-presidents-as-illegitimate-heres-why/?utm_term=.d7180578e1af

*Note: Digital access is unlimited through Sat in honor of the inauguration!

 

The Threat to Ohio Voters

Since 2012, an estimated 200,000 Ohio voters have been purged from the rolls due to inactivity–defined as not voting since 2008.  Democrats–especially low-income African American ones–are disproportionately affected, since Republicans vote more in midterms, according to Reuters.

The practice of regular maintenance of correct rolls is national, but in Ohio it may determine the presidential election outcome.  All states routinely remove residents who have died or moved away, and several cleanse the roll of inactive voters. But in some counties in Ohio, the rate of purge approaches 13% of voters–higher than the margins that let Obama win in those counties in 2008.

According to electoral experts, the rule of thumb is that passing on three consecutive federal elections makes you a candidate for purging.

“Tom Fitton, the head of Judicial Watch, a conservative group that has pushed Ohio and other states to keep their voting lists up to date, described (an Ohio) lawsuit as a “power play” by civil liberties groups ‘to ensure that candidates they like are able to steal elections if necessary.’

Voters’ rights come back to the fore before every US presidential election, but unlike more well-known controversies like picture ID requirements, inactivity purges have been flying under the radar.

ModCon supports the practice: citizens who cannot be bothered to vote within eight years are not sufficiently engaged enough to deserve a say in the nation’s future.

 

How History Explains Trump’s Appeal

Trump is attracting voters from all sides, and his ideology is to have no ideology.

Timothy P. Carney posted a great piece on the AEI blog about how the last several decades’ emphasis on two extremes may finally be correcting course, as evidenced by Donald Trump’s success; his lack of knowledge and policy makes him an ally to many Americans, who use,” love of country” as the new political spectrum to replace left—right.

Therefore, understanding his strength will be the first step toward diverting his supporters and defeating him.

Midterm Elections: Cocktail Party Tidbits

By now you’ve likely heard the basic takeaways from Tuesday’s election: Republicans gained a majority in the Senate, as well as picked up more House seats.

Gains are common for a minority party in a president’s second term; but below are four lesser-known facts from the 2014 contest.  Feel free to use them as conversation-starters at your next cocktail party:

1. Only one governor of each party lost incumbency.

2. Women had a great day: Elise Stefanik, age 30, of New York’s 21st will become the youngest woman to ever serve in Congress, Joni Ernst of Iowa will be the first female combat veteran to serve in the Senate, and Mia Love (UT-4) will be the first black woman from the GOP to serve in the House.  Please note, all these women are Republicans.

3. Men supported the legalization of marijuana more strongly than women–but only slightly more.

4. The new GOP House majority has not been this wide since WWII.  246 GOP seats were last held in 1947 when Pres. Truman was in office.  Republicans had a peak of 270 seats in 1929 under Pres. Herbert Hoover.

Do you think the next Congress will be better or worse than our current one?